HI 1073 - Discussion Section Manual - United States History 1877 to Present - Fall 2019 Study Guide. Rated A+ - €17,29   Añadir al carrito

Study guide

HI 1073 - Discussion Section Manual - United States History 1877 to Present - Fall 2019 Study Guide. Rated A+

HI 1073 United States History 1877 to Present, Mississippi State University. Chapter 1 – Reconstruction and Expansion, Assimilation and Exclusion 1. U. S. Constitution, Amendments XII, XIV, and XV 2. Frederick Douglass Assesses Reconstruction (1880) 3. Sharecropping Contract (1879) 4. 1890 Mississippi Constitution 5. Louisiana’s “Grandfather Plan” (1898) 6. Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) 7. A Red Record (1895) 8. Atlanta Exposition Address (1895) 9. Of Mr. Booker T. Washington and Others (1903) 10. The Chinese Exclusion Act (1882) 11. An Italian Immigrant’s Experience (1902) 12. Chief Joseph’s Story (1879) 13. The Indians Must Be Assimilated 14. Life on the Prairie Farms (1893) 15. The Significance of the Frontier in American History 16. An American Woman Travels West (1886) 16a. Historians Confront the Past: Professor Anne E. Marshall, “Kentucky’s Separate Coach Law and African American Response, 1892-¬‐1900,” printed with permission of the Register of the Kentucky Historical Society, Vol. 98, No. 3 (Summer 2000). Chapter 2 -¬‐ Industrialization and its Discontents 17. The Gospel of Wealth (1889) 18. Mark Twain Satirizes the Battle Hymn Of the Republic (1900) 19. Preamble to the Constitution of the Knights of Labor (1878) 20. The Pullman Strike (1894) 21. Preamble of the Industrial Workers of the World (1905) 22. The Principles of Scientific Management (1911) 23. Studies of Factory Life: Among the Women (1888) 24. Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle (1906) 25. How the Other Half Lives (1890) 26. The New South (1886) 27. People’s (Populist) Party National Platform (1892) 28. Cross of Gold Speech (1896) 28a. Historians Confront the Past: Professor James C. Giesen, “’The Truth About the Boll Weevil: The Nature of Planter 3 Chapter 3 -¬‐ The Progressive Era 29. Sherman Anti-¬‐Trust Act (1890) 30. The Shame of the Cities (1903) 31. The Church and the Social Crisis (1907) 32. The Democratic Schoolroom (1900) 33. Club Work of Colored Women (1901) 34. Twenty Years at Hull House (1910) 35. Margaret Sanger and Birth Control (1917) 36. The Report of the Country Life Commission (1909) 37. The Fight for Conservation (1910) 38. The Effect of the Ballot on Mothers (1890) 39. The Effect of Women on Government (1898) 40. Why Women Should Vote (1910) 41. Theodore Roosevelt’s New Nationalism (1910) 42. Woodrow Wilson’s New Freedom (1913) 43. Socialist Party Platform (1912) 43a. Historians Confront the Past: Professor Mark Hersey, “Hints and Suggestions to Farmers: George Washington Carver and Rural Conservation in the South,” Printed with permission of Environmental History 11 (April 2006): 239-¬‐ 268. Chapter 4 -¬‐ The United States Becomes a World Power 44. The Influence of Sea Power upon History (1890) 45. Platt Amendment (1903) 46. Roosevelt Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine (1904) 47. President Wilson’s War Message to Congress (1917) 48. Senator Robert M. La Follette Voices his Dissent (1917) 49. Propaganda and War 50. The Fourteen Points (1918) 51. Sen. Lodge’s Reservations to the League of Nations (1919) 52. Black Soldiers Return Home (1919) 53. The Occupation of Haiti (1920) Chapter 5 -¬‐ The Interwar Years 54. Opposing Positions on a Proposed Equal Rights Bill (1922) 55. The Impact of the Automobile (1922) 56. The Scopes Trial (1925) 57. Immigration Restriction (1924) 58. Alain Locke on “The New Negro” 59. Franklin D. Roosevelt’s First Inaugural Address (1933) 60. The Civilian Conservation Corps 61. The Federal Arts Project 62. Share the Wealth Plan 63. Social Security Act (1935) 64. NLRB v. Jones & Laughlin Steel (1937) 65. Republican and Democratic Platforms (1936) 65a. Historians Confront the Past: Professor Alison Collis Greene, “The Faith of the ‘flotsam and jetsam’,” Journal of Southern Religion 13 (2011): Click Here Chapter 6 -¬‐ World War II 66. The Atlantic Charter (1941) 67. The America First Committee 68. Randolph’s Call to March on Washington (1941) 69. FDR Creates the Committee on Fair Employment Practice (1941) 70. Japanese-¬‐American Evacuation and Internment 71. President Roosevelt’s War Message to the Congress (1941) 72. General MacArthur's Radio Message (1944) 73. The G.I. Bill of Rights (1944) 74. The Yalta Accords (1945) 75. The Franck Report on Nuclear Weaponry (1945) 76. Pres. Truman on Potsdam and the Atomic Bomb (1945) 76a. Historians Confront the Past: Professor Jason Morgan Ward, “‘No Jap Crow’: Japanese Americans Encounter the World War II South” Printed with the permission of The Journal of Southern History 50, No. 1, (February 2007): 75-¬‐ 104. Chapter 7 -¬‐ The Cold War Era 5 77. George F. Kennan’s “Long Telegram” (1946) 78. The Truman Doctrine (1947) 79. Truman on the Federal Employee Loyalty Program (1947) 80. Ronald Reagan Testifies On Communists in Hollywood (1947) 81. Senator McCarthy Warns of Communist Infiltration (1950) 82. National Security Policy Council Paper (NSC-¬‐68) (1950) 83. John Foster Dulles on Massive Retaliation (1954) 84. Eisenhower Warns of a Military-¬‐Industrial Complex (1961) 84a. Historians Confront the Past: Professor Richard V. Damms, “In Search of ‘Some Big, Imaginative Plan’: the Eisenhower Administration and American Strategy in the Middle East After Suez,” printed with permission from Simon C. Smith, ed., Reassessing Suez 1956: New Perspectives on the Crisis and Its Aftermath (Aldershot, UK: Ashgate, 2008), 179-¬‐ 94. Chapter 8 -¬‐ Rights and Resistance 85. Truman’s Civil Rights Message to the Congress (1948) 86. Brown v. Board of Education (1954) 87. The Southern Manifesto (1956) 88. Malcolm X’s “Message to the Grassroots” (1963) 89. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 90. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 91. President’s Commission on the Status of Women (1963) 92. National Organization for Women Statement of Purpose (1966) 93. Equal Rights Amendment (1972) 94. Roe v. Wade (1973) 94a. Historians Confront the Past: Professor Michael Vinson Williams, “The Struggle for Black Citizenship: Medgar Wiley Evers and the Fight for Civil Rights in Mississippi,” in The Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi, edited by Ted Ownby, 59-¬‐89. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2013. Printed with permission from the University Press of Mississippi. Chapter 9 – The Great Society, Vietnam, and the Crisis of Confidence 95. Lyndon Johnson Promotes The Great Society (1964) 96. The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution (1964) 97. Senator Ernest Gruening Dissents (1964) 98. Johnson Explains U.S. Involvement in Vietnam (1965) 99. “We Refuse to Serve” (1967) 100. The Student Non-¬‐Violent Coordinating Committee on Vietnam (1967) 101. President Johnson’s Address to the Nation Announcing Steps to Limit the Vietnam War and Reporting His Decision Not to Seek Reelection (1968) 102. Nixon’s “Silent Majority” Speech (1969) 103. The Watergate Smoking Gun (1972) 104. Jimmy Carter on the Energy Crisis (1977) Chapter 10 -¬‐ The Rise of Conservatism and the Post-¬‐Cold War Order 105. Why the New Right is Winning (1981) 106. Reagan’s “Evil Empire” Speech (1983) 107. Jesse Jackson’s 1984 Democratic Convention Speech 108. Iran-¬‐Contra Affair (1987) 109. George H. W. Bush and the New World Order (1991) 110. Republican Contract with America (1994) 111. Bill Clinton Endorses the Welfare Reform Act (1996) 112. Articles of Impeachment Against Clinton (1999) 113. Bush v. Gore (2000) 337 114. George W. Bush’s Second Inaugural Address (2005) 115. Barack Obama, “A More Perfect Union,” (2008)

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